Repair Cracks in Front Loader Bucket

This project was off Eight Mile Road in Stockton.  Mark from Blue Iron, Inc., www.blueironinc.com, called and asked that I repair the cracks, there were several.

This was a crack around the lift pin boss

 I used an air arc, or arc gouging process to clean out the crack.  Sometimes the crack does not go all the way through the material and it is imperitive the crack is removed from the material or gouged out then welded up completely. 

Same crack repaired.

Some welders like to use the Stick welding process , SMAW, to weld these cracks up typically a rod with the 7018 designation.  This process is adequite, it provides a strong weld and when done properly the crack should not come back.  However it has one down fall and in my opinion only one, its speed.  I was able to utilize the wire welding process, FCAW, I used NR 232. 

Anothercrack in the same bucket

Crack welded up

Another view of cracks welded up.

There were a total of 12 seperate cracks with a total of about 55 – 60 lineal inches combined.  This project was completed 2 – 3 hours faster because I used the FCAW process instead of the SMAW process.

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Sloppy Pivot Pins on Large Front Loader

 

Chatfields in Sacramento, CA has an old large front loader.  They had an issue with the pivot pins in the lifting arms and dump arms breaking the keeper bolts and the pins evenually starting to slide out.

  They wanted me to just weld the pins in place, however that would not have solved their problem.  The pivot pins where getting loose because either they were wearing out or the bushings were wearing out.  In other words the hole the pin was in was either to large for the pin because the bushings were worn out or the pin was too small due to it being worn out.  If I had welded the pin in place the welds would have eventually broken due to the stress on the pin from working in a sloppy hole.  The correct fix was to replace either the bushings or the pins or both.  The field quick fix is to weld something to the opposite side of the pin so the pin cannot come out.  I had some 1/2″ x 1/2″ solid square bar on my truck and used that as the keeper so the pin would not slide out.  I just welded the square bar to the pin so the pin was not locked in.